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ALEXANDRIA by NIGHT
Day 2
Early morning breakfast at hotel.
Then ready to enjoy the city tour in Alexandria by visiting “ The Greco –Roman Museum, El
Morsi Abu El Abbas Mosque, The citadel of Qaite bay ”
Lunch at local restaurant on The Beach “ Mix Grills “
Transfer by Bus back to hotel.
In the evening get ready to ride a comfortable carriage waiting for you front of the hotel drive
you to have a round trip in Alexandria by night then enjoy a luxury Sea Food dinner & Wine on
yacht .
After this wonderful evening back to your hotel.
--GAT Tours ("Experience the Joy and Tenderness of Egypt")
dramatically orange-lit temple portico; night skyline with extravagant fireworks
And as for our future, one will hardly find us again on the paths of those Egyptian youths who
endanger temples by night, embrace statues, and want by all means to unveil, uncover, and
put into a bright light whatever is kept concealed for good reasons. No, this bad taste, this will
to truth, to "truth at any price, ” this youthful madness in the love of truth, have lost their charm
for us: for that we are too serious, too merry, too burned, too profound. We no longer believe
that truth remains truth when the veils are withdrawn.  —Friedrich Nietzsche
top: Alexandria Quartet cover; bottom: old gilt leather History of Egypt (Vol. IX Maspero, Vols. X & XII Rappoport)
It is not hard, writing at this
remove in time, to realize that
it had all already happened,
had been ordained in such a
way and in no other. This
was so to speak, only its
“coming to pass”—its stage
of manifestation. But the
scenario had already been
devised, somewhere, the
actors chosen, the timing
rehearsed down to the last
detail in the mind of that
invisible author—which
perhaps would prove to be
only the city itself: the
Alexandria of the human
estate. (Clea 223)

--Lawrence Durrell, The
Alexandria Quartet
My spirit trembles with joy as I
contemplate this city of light
which a divine accident might
create before our very eyes at
any moment! Here art will find
its true form and place, and the
artist can play like a fountain
without contention, without
even trying. (Clea 141)

--Lawrence Durrell, The
Alexandria Quartet
In this reign was finished the
lighthouse on the island of Pharos, as
a guide to ships when entering the
harbour of Alexandria by night. The
navigation of the waters of the Red
Sea, along which the wind blows hard
from the north for nine months in the
year, was found so dangerous by the
little vessels from the south of Arabia,
that they always chose the most
southerly port in which they could meet
the Egyptian buyers. The merchants
with their bales of goods found a
journey on camels through the desert,
where the path is marked only by the
skeletons of the animals that have died
upon the route, less costly than a
coasting voyage. Hence, when
Philadelphus had made the whole of
Upper Egypt to the cataracts at Aswan
(Syênê) as quiet and safe as the
Delta, he made a new port on the
rocky coast of the Red Sea, nearly two
hundred miles to the south of Cosseir,
and named it Berenicê after his mother.

(HISTORY OF EGYPT From 330 B.C.
to the Present Time By S.
RAPPOPORT, Doctor of Philosophy,
Basel -- Member of the Ecole Langues
Orientales, Paris; Russian, German,
French Orientalist and Philologist --
VOL. X., Part B.)
two images of the Pharos lighthouse in Alexandria's harbor; one a b&w sketch, one a smoky-looking painting
He could hear, like the distant
reverberations of the city’s memory,
the voice of Plotinus speaking, not of
flight away from intolerable temporal
conditions but towards a new light, a
new city of Light. “This is no journey
for the feet, however. Look into
yourself, withdraw into yourself and
look.” But this was the one act of
which he now knew himself for ever
incapable. (Justine 181)

--Lawrence Durrell, The Alexandria
Quartet
two renditions of the Pharos lighthouse by Dali in 1954, one in greens and yellows, one in ochre tones
Originally there was a lot of reverb in
the piece, to increase the sense of
confusion, but I decided it was too
much (decide for yourself:
Original
Alexandria by Night). Jerusalem also
gave birth to the very spare
Vigil, the
difficult but rewarding
Wailing Wall,
and the ultra-dense and over-the top
Madding Crowd. (Of those, I would
love to see
Wailing Wall as a live
performance.)
Half-heard and unknown (indeed
perhaps unknowable) sounds emanate
from unseen places and drift into the
ancient streets of an exotic and often
dangerous city. This piece grew out of
Jerusalem Weeps...